President Obama’sspeech on immigration

Pres­i­dent Obama has laid out his plans for immi­gra­tion reform… he plans to use exec­u­tive actions to make it hap­pen… his efforts should keep 5 mil­lion immi­grants liv­ing in the U.S. ille­gally from being deported… he says he wants immi­gra­tion enforce­ment efforts to focus on “felons, not fam­i­lies.” Pres­i­dent obama says immi­grants who’ve lived ille­gally in the U.S. for more than five years can avoid being deported if their chil­dren are cit­i­zens or law­ful per­ma­nent res­i­dents, and they pass back­ground checks and pay fees. They also can get work per­mits. Gov­er­nor Brown said in a state­ment that the pres­i­dent “stepped up for hard-working fam­i­lies across Amer­ica” in the face of Wash­ing­ton grid­lock but called on Con­gress to “fin­ish the job” by pass­ing immi­gra­tion reform leg­is­la­tion. Not all Cal­i­for­ni­ans cel­e­brated. Escon­dido Mayor Sam Abed, who has cham­pi­oned local poli­cies aimed at reduc­ing ille­gal immi­gra­tion in his city of 150,000 peo­ple, said he wouldn’t lis­ten to Obama’s speech.

Mendocino County Final Vote Count Almost Complete

Accord­ing to Sue Ranochak, of The Men­do­cino County Clerk and Recorder’s Office has yet to release an offi­cial elec­tion count, although one can be expected by Thanks­giv­ing. On Wednes­day, Ranochak said the depart­ment con­tin­ues to work toward an offi­cial count, which has been an ongo­ing process, but didn’t say how many were left to be counted, nor how many are being counted daily. Besides count­ing, Ranochak said polling place inven­to­ries have to be bal­anced, pro­vi­sional bal­lots have to be authen­ti­cated, and vote-by-mail bal­lots have to be checked for dam­ages. She said the bal­anc­ing has been com­pleted and the pro­vi­sional bal­lots that have been authen­ti­cated are ready to be counted. The last unof­fi­cial update came Nov. 6 and indi­cated Men­do­cino County still had 13,072 vote-by-mail bal­lots to process, and 452 pro­vi­sional bal­lots, or those that were cast by vot­ers with ques­tion­able eli­gi­bil­ity. And so the process continues.

Mendocino County Election Vote Count Almost Complete

Accord­ing to Sue Ranochak, of The Men­do­cino County Clerk and Recorder’s Office has yet to release an offi­cial elec­tion count, although one can be expected by Thanks­giv­ing. On Wednes­day, Ranochak said the depart­ment con­tin­ues to work toward an offi­cial count, which has been an ongo­ing process, but didn’t say how many were left to be counted, nor how many are being counted daily. Besides count­ing, Ranochak said polling place inven­to­ries have to be bal­anced, pro­vi­sional bal­lots have to be authen­ti­cated, and vote-by-mail bal­lots have to be checked for dam­ages. She said the bal­anc­ing has been com­pleted and the pro­vi­sional bal­lots that have been authen­ti­cated are ready to be counted. The last unof­fi­cial update came Nov. 6 and indi­cated Men­do­cino County still had 13,072 vote-by-mail bal­lots to process, and 452 pro­vi­sional bal­lots, or those that were cast by vot­ers with ques­tion­able eli­gi­bil­ity. And so the process continues.

Hazmobile Event Today and Tomorrow

The next Haz­Mo­bile event will be held today and tomor­row, at High­lands Senior Service/Community Cen­ter, 3245 Bow­ers Avenue in Clear­lake.
Hours are from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. House­holds can bring up to 15 gal­lons of toxic items free of charge. Items that are accepted include paint, sol­vents, fuels, five-gallon propane tanks, pool chem­i­cals, pes­ti­cides, her­bi­cides, bat­ter­ies, flu­o­res­cent light tubes (up to 60 lin­ear feet), and other toxic mate­ri­als that can­not be put in the trash. Items that can­not be accepted include tele­vi­sions, com­puter mon­i­tors, ammu­ni­tion, explo­sives, radioac­tive mate­ri­als or infec­tious wastes. The Haz­Mo­bile pro­gram is sub­si­dized by the Lake County Pub­lic Ser­vices Depart­ment, Inte­grated Waste Man­age­ment Divi­sion and Cal­Re­cy­cle as a pub­lic ser­vice to Lake County residents.

Lake County Vote Count Almost Finalized

The Lake County Reg­is­trar of Vot­ers Office is get­ting closer to final­iz­ing the vote count for the Nov. 4 gen­eral elec­tion. The offi­cial elec­tion can­vass includes count­ing the remain­ing absen­tee , or vote-by-mail, and pro­vi­sional bal­lots that weren’t tal­lied elec­tion night, total­ing 5,536 bal­lots. The pre­lim­i­nary count released on elec­tion night included absen­tees and pro­vi­sion­als that the reg­is­trar of vot­erso ffice had received by Oct. 31. Under Cal­i­for­nia state law, the results from the gen­eral elec­tio must be cer­ti­fied by no later than Tues­day, Dec. 2. The reg­is­trar says the offi­cial state­ment of votes cast at the gen­eral elec­tion will be pre­sented to the Lake County Board of Super­vi­sors at its reg­u­lar meet­ing on Tuesday.

Palace Hotel Red Tags To Go Away

The Palace Hotel will be say­ing good­bye to some­thing today — the red tags that have been there for about a year. The tags were placed there by the state’s office of the Occu­pa­tional Safety and Health Admin­is­tra­tion to stop work inside because of asbestos con­cerns. The hotel’s owner has hired a con­trac­tor to remove the haz­ardous mate­r­ial and the removal plan has been approved by CAL/OSHA. The asbestos should be removed from the hotel some­time in January.

Droughts Affect on Native American Artifacts

Author­i­ties are inves­ti­gat­ing an alarm­ing biprod­uct of california’s drought…Complaints of van­dal­ism and loot­ing of native amer­i­can remains and arti­facts have risen while water lev­els have receded in california’s lakes, rivers, streams and reser­voirs. The cal­i­for­nia native amer­i­can her­itage com­mis­sion and the state office of his­toric preser­va­tion are urg­ing peo­ple to pro­tect these resources as the drought exposes more sites. Sev­eral state and fed­eral laws pro­tect native amer­i­can sites and arti­facts. It’s actu­ally a felony to obtain or pos­sess native amer­i­can arti­facts or remains taken from a grave or bur­ial site.

Shelter Under Temporary Cat Quarantine

Cats are tem­porar­ily not being accepted at the Men­do­cino County ani­mal shel­ter, after a kit­ten that was brought in died from a feline virus. The shel­ter iso­lated all of the affected kit­tens after a test con­firmed the kit­ten that died had pan­leukope­nia. A quar­an­tine on bring­ing new cats into the shel­ter is in place to pre­vent an out­break. David Jensen, the county’s direc­tor of envi­ron­men­tal health told the Ukiah Daily Jour­nal that the shel­ter is under­go­ing a “major cleaning.”

Shelter Under Temporary Cat Quarantine

Cats are tem­porar­ily not being accepted at the Men­do­cino County ani­mal shel­ter, after a kit­ten that was brought in died from a feline virus. The shel­ter iso­lated all of the affected kit­tens after a test con­firmed the kit­ten that died had pan­leukope­nia. A quar­an­tine on bring­ing new cats into the shel­ter is in place to pre­vent an out­break. David Jensen, the county’s direc­tor of envi­ron­men­tal health told the Ukiah Daily Jour­nal that the shel­ter is under­go­ing a “major cleaning.”

Animal Shelter Under Temporary Cat Quarantine

Cats are tem­porar­ily not being accepted at the Men­do­cino County ani­mal shel­ter, after a kit­ten that was brought in died from a feline virus. The shel­ter iso­lated all of the affected kit­tens after a test con­firmed the kit­ten that died had pan­leukope­nia. A quar­an­tine on bring­ing new cats into the shel­ter is in place to pre­vent an out­break. David Jensen, the county’s direc­tor of envi­ron­men­tal health told the Ukiah Daily Jour­nal that the shel­ter is under­go­ing a “major cleaning.”